Mavyret (glecaprevir and pibrentasvir)

Mavyret is a prescription treatment that combines two drugs that treat hepatitis C virus (HCV): glecaprevir and pibrentasvir. Manufactured by AbbVie Inc., Mavyret is approved to treat adults with chronic HCV without cirrhosis. People with a type of cirrhosis called “compensated” cirrhosis can also take Mavyret. Compensated cirrhosis has not progressed to an advanced stage, called decompensated cirrhosis. Mavyret is used to treat all six genotypes (strains) of HCV (1-6). Mavyret can also be used to treat people with HCV genotype 1 infection who have been previously treated with either a NS5A inhibitor or an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, but not both.1

What are the ingredients in Mavyret?

The two active ingredients in Mavyret are glecaprevir and pibrentasvir. Mavyret also contains several inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, copovidone (type K 28), croscarmellose sodium, hypromellose 2910, iron oxide red, lactose monohydrate, polyethylene glycol 3350, propylene glycol monocaprylate (type II), sodium stearyl fumarate, titanium dioxide, and vitamin E (tocopherol) polyethylene glycol succinate.1

How does Mavyret work?

The two drugs in Mavyret work in different ways to attack the hepatitis C virus. Glecaprevir is an inhibitor of the protease HCV NS3/4A, which is essential for the virus to replicate. Pibrentasvir inhibits HCV NS5A, another essential component for viral replication. By interrupting the virus’s ability to replicate, Mavyret can reduce the HCV in the body to undetectable levels.1

What are the possible side effects of Mavyret?

The most common side effects experienced by patients taking Mavyret in clinical trials were headache and fatigue. Any side effect that does not go away should be mentioned to your doctor.1
Mavyret has a black box warning, the strictest warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because of its potential to cause a reactivation of hepatitis B virus, which may result in liver failure and may lead to death. Patients should be tested for current or prior HBV before using Mavyret. People who have previously had an HBV infection should be closely monitored while using Mavyret as well as after treatment has concluded. The risk of reactivation of a prior HBV infection is increased in patients who are taking certain immunosuppressant or chemotherapy drugs.1

Things to know about Mavyret

Prior to starting treatment with Mavyret, patients should be tested for HBV infection.1
Before taking Mavyret, patients should talk to their doctor about all their medical conditions, including:

  • Ever having hepatitis B virus infection
  • Any liver problems other than HCV
  • Pregnancy or planning to become pregnant
  • Breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed1,2

Mavyret has not been tested for safety during pregnancy or breastfeeding, and it is not known whether Mavyret may harm a baby. Women who are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, are breastfeeding or planning to should discuss their options for treatment with their doctor.1
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about all prescription and over-the-counter medications you are taking, as well as any vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you take, as some of these may interact with Mavyret. There is an increased risk of HBV reactivation in people taking certain immunosuppressant or chemotherapy drugs. Other known compounds that can impact the effectiveness of Mavyret and should not be taken during treatment with Mavyet include carbamazepine, efavirenz, and St. John’s wort.1

Dosing information

A tablet of Mavyret contains a combination of 100 mg glecaprevir and 40 mg pibrentasvir. The recommended dose of Mavyret is three tablets taken once daily with food. The duration of treatment varies depending on the individual patient from 8 weeks to 16 weeks.1

Written by: Emily Downward | Last reviewed: September 2017.
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