Treatment Help From Gilead Sciences, Maker of Harvoni

If you need help with your diagnosed, genotype-1 hepatitis C, you may qualify for help from Gilead Sciences, maker of Harvoni – the miracle drug with the 96% cure rate. The drug is very expensive – $1,000 per pill, but don’t let the market price keep you from getting the help you need. Gilead offers a compassionate care program at mysupportpath.com. You can take advantage of this resource whether you have insurance or not. Even if your insurance denies you – which is common, due to an emerging cost-based policy of insurances putting off approval until the patient has sustained significant liver damage, you may still qualify for help from Gilead. Remember, Harvoni has been approved for genotype-1 only, so make sure you know your genotype before applying for help.

You’ll need a doctor to provide a diagnosis and your stage and grade of liver damage, along with a recommendation for treatment. If you don’t have a doctor, or you’re in need of testing, go to help4hep.org, and call their toll-free number. They will guide you through the entire process of getting the help you need at no cost. Even if you use IV drugs, this service could save your life.

If you have insurance, and a doctor, and you’ve been denied for Harvoni treatment, you’ll need your doctor to submit an appeal to your insurance. If you get a second denial, and recommendation for treatment from your M.D., Gilead will supply your medicine at no cost. If you’re approved for treatment, but can’t afford your co-pay, Gilead will help you with that, too. All of this information is available at Gilead’s mysupportpath.com.

This is a first for the insurance industry – denying treatment for early hepC disease. Many advocates see this as dangerous policy, putting the patient at unnecessary risk. As years go by, numerous related health problems may develop, including secondary diabetes, blistering skin disease (porphyria cutanea tarda), iron overload (hemochromatosis) which can harm internal organs, and may require bloodletting (phlebotomy), gastroparesis (delayed stomach emptying) which can lead to a need for surgery – severing the vagus nerve, and varicose veins in the stomach (varices), which can cause bleeding. Advocates all over the country are working hard to convince Gilead to lower their price. As new drugs enter the marketplace, it is believed that competition will force prices to go down.

It may be a first for a huge pharma in the hepC milleu, too. While compassionate care programs are common in the arena of catastrophic disease, this kind of help for curing hepC is rare. Hopefully, Gilead’s program will turn out to be easily navigated, and a sure source of help for this potentially deadly disease.

There is also a combination therapy – also from Gilead available for approximately half the price of Harvoni: Sovaldi (a component of Harvoni) and Olysio. This treatment option is nearly as effective as Harvoni, with a reasonable side-effect profile. Ask your doctor about this treatment option.

If you have questions, go to help4hep.org. Their trained counselors will explain everything.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The HepatitisC.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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