Never Say Never

Another saying all of us are familiar with, and understand the meaning, I will wager. Giving up is not an option if we are fighting for wellness and our foe is as formidable as hepatitis C.

From what I have seen in people who are living with hep C, we are a formidable group and not prone to give up. I am not trying to make brownie points with you but only calling it as I see it.

Failure is something we all know in our lives. I never try to paint things in an unrealistic way or a way, which only appeals to the hopes and dreams we have because life is precious but still has its disappointments. This is reality.

The most difficult part with disappointments can be how we live with them, and learn to overcome the feelings they cause. This has been true for me and I don’t think it is all that unique with people who are living with a chronic disease, especially when securing treatment becomes such a large part of the struggle.

I am not trying to be a downer because I am big on hope and being positive, but another reality for me is that not everything I hope for will come to be just because I hope it does. It is a tough lesson for some of us, yet I still believe that these struggles help to build our character and make us stronger in time.

Never is a very long time if we look at it in the truest form. The word (never) has its roots in old English, and in that old version of English it was two words joined that said “not ever”

Sounds final to me and not open to debate as to it being anything but final. Some might be more subjective about what it means but saying never means not ever to me. Never saying never simply suggests that we are not willing to give up hope on the future, which is the opposite of never to me. Without belief in tomorrow we cannot have hope about things we may be facing today which appear hopeless.

Maybe I am rambling a bit as I am prone to do at times, but it is in my nature to question things, and that includes things we say and how they can shape our views.

There is no doubt, or very little, that when we face difficult times we can dwell in some dark places and I have at times just like many of you. Is it about winning or losing? I don’t frame things in that way because it makes it feel like a competition, and we are not running a race, and there is no finish line is there? There are some prizes to be won, and being cured of hep C is a big one but we are not in competition with anyone despite the battles fought.

Are we running out of time? No way, not ever.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The HepatitisC.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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