Keep Moving As Much As You Reasonably Can

It is understandable that we can’t all run a marathon or even walk a block, but one thing I have believed for a long time is the importance of staying in motion.

I don’t mean working out or lifting weights or even taking up a strenuous activity, unless you want to or can, and these kinds of activities can be both fun and healthy, unless overdone.

I am talking about activity that helps prevent atrophy and muscle wasting, which impact our quality of life in many ways.

Independence is important to us all, and it is a basic need regardless of age or physical limitation.

Can you go to the market on your own?

Can you make it to doctor appointments or other important meetings that can affect your well-being? If we are not independent it is not always easy or convenient to depend on others. Not because they don’t want to help necessarily, but if you are like most people you don’t like asking if you can manage yourself.

There is no question that some will need assistance in doing these things and even more basic tasks, to include personal hygiene, not to mention getting in and out of bed. If we are disabled by illness or something we were born with, it can be challenging to stay active.

I have known many people who have challenges in mobility who participate in things, which I would consider good activity, and they do more than so-called able-bodied people.

These people amaze and inspire me.

I was once very ill for a prolonged period. I found it hard to walk up the stairs to bed a difficult thing that required several breaks along the way. As a result, I stopped moving very much and my muscles wasted to the point where the tissue that was once firm hung off my bones likes a bag of goo. I was shaken by the realization that my muscles had atrophied to this stage. I had never experience anything like that in my life. I had always been active in sport, and my work involved some degree of physical activity, as well I always had dogs that needed walking.

I decided to start moving again. I remember the moment like it was just minutes ago, even though it was years back. Fear motivated me to move, being afraid of what was happening to me. An amazing motivator fear is, and no surprise it is used so often to persuade people to believe in things that may not always be so positive, but in this case it worked for me in a positive way. Curious as it is to me now, reflecting on this moment of realization, all those years ago.

It wasn’t very much action at first, but as time passed I did more. It took far longer to get the muscles I had lost back than it took for them to atrophy. I had heard this for years but never had experience it myself. What an eye-opener it was.

It reminded me just how important activity was, not only for muscle tone because it is not about being pretty or buff like some might believe, but about good health. As much as a good diet and being hep c free is important, and being hep c free is amazing, this is simply another piece in a pie of good health. Even pie is good for our health-mental health at least, as long as it isn’t every day!

Activity need not be strenuous, as I have read again and again, simple and routine walking, stretching, lifting yourself up and out, and moving around the house or the block is all going to help. Start easy, this is not a race or competition after all. You do as little or as much as you feel comfortable with, and no pain no gain is crap, so no need to feel pain to get benefits from moving your body.

This is not about weight loss either, but the more you move you may well lose unwanted weight as a bonus or even gain weight and have a better appetite too. You may also find that other movements will work better too!

Good luck.

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